Theatre

Articles

Smart F#*king Play

Stupid Fucking Bird implants itself behind laughs in new existential play. Only when I was home from the theatre and laying may head onto the pillow, lights off, quiet, and all alone, [See More]

Through Thick and Thin, But It’s Always Thin

Contigo Pan y Cebolla Looks A Lot Like America Today In 1955, Havana, Cuba, life was not characterized by the communist revolution yet. It was very Western, complete with capitalists, cars, radios, [See More]

Empathy for Ahab

OR, THE WHALE BREATHES NEW AIR INTO THE SAILS OF A SINKING SHIP Coinciding the end of its run with the Fertile Ground Festival, Portland Experimental Theater Ensemble (PETE) adapts Juli Crockett’s [See More]

Undress The Monster

Frankenstein: A Cabaret is a modern-day folk-opera about female sexuality, desire and creativity. Much grabs the attention in The Broken Planetarium’s presentation of Frankenstein: A Cabaret even before the show starts. On Thursday [See More]

ALL THAT I TAKE FOR GRANTED

The Miracle Worker reminds one of the gift of consciousness. Spoiler Caution: the following review assumes you are totally familiar with this classic play from 1960, as it is depicted in the [See More]

Misunderstood: One Witch’s Story

“BROOMSTICK,” A PLAY ABOUT A WITCH WITH AN IDENTITY CRISIS COMES TO ARTISTS REPERTORY THEATER The lights come up on a witch’s cottage complete with a wall o’ potions and a number [See More]

What The Dead Live For

Last night at the La Muerte Baila performance at the Milagro Theatre in southeast Portland, I wrote down the name of a friend who passed away two years ago. The performance marked [See More]

Ominous Om´s and Hellish Horseheads

You know you’ve found yourself at an absurdly deranged theater show when during the performance you begin silently scribbling to yourself the following;                     [See More]

Sex With Strangers (and people you think you know)

Laura Easton’s play about writing and sex in the eBook age comes to Portland Center Stage Perhaps it’s fitting—given the audience’s expectations—that the setting of Laura Easton’s play about two writers trapped [See More]